Planetary Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter

For those of you who missed it this past week, there was a very close conjunction of the planets Venus and Jupiter in the early evening skies. Over the last several months, Venus and Jupiter have been moving steadily closer together in the night sky, culminating in their closest approach on Tuesday, March 13. At their closest approach, the two planets were about 3 degrees apart (the distance across a few fingers held at arm’s length), and stayed close together for the next few days.

The picture above was taken from our balcony in Southern Ontario at about 7:30 PM (EST). Venus is the brighter planet, on the right. For a better view of the conjunction, check out these (less blurry) pictures at Space.com.

Venus will be in the news this June, as it makes its transit across the sun June 5-6. This transit happens twice in eight years, then returns after a 105 and then 122-year gap. The last conjunction happened in 2004, and before that, in 1882. But you’d better catch the transit this June if you ever want to see it in action – the next transit won’t happen until December 2117!

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